Category Archives: camouflage

How and why automakers work hard to camouflage their cars

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Chevy Volt Spy Shots

Carmakers assign engineers to be in charge of developing bespoke camouflage for each new model.

We've all see those photos of hotly anticipated upcoming models wrapped in black padding and crazy checkerboard and swirl patterns, and maybe wondered if all that is really necessary.

It is no off-the-cuff exercise; carmakers assign engineers to be in charge of developing bespoke camouflage for each new model. They work in conjunction with the vehicle's designers to erase character lines almost as soon as they are drawn. It is important to keep future products secret, to avoid undercutting the sales of current products and to build anticipation of the new product.

"We like to save the big splash for when things come out looking beautiful and pretty," noted Chevrolet Volt chief engineer Andrew Farah, pictured above. Indeed, the hazard of premature release of not-quite-done prototypes was illustrated by the online backlash that erupted against the Jeep Cherokee when unflattering photos of unfinished prototypes leaked in advance of that vehicle's debut.

Stopping that is hard to do when your product is 15 feet long and needs to be extensively tested outdoors and in public during its development. That need, combined with carmakers' tendency to rely on the same testing venues time after time create the environment for automotive paparazzi photographers who rival celebrity shooters for their ingenuity and persistence.

Continue reading How and why automakers work hard to camouflage their cars

How and why automakers work hard to camouflage their cars originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 07 Nov 2014 15:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Ford car-camo artist works his craft on Australia’s new Falcon XR8

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Ford Falcon camouflage

Ford is among the kings of concealment when it comes to test cars. On one recent Mustang SVT mule, the automaker went to the extreme of putting baffles over the exhausts to hide how many there were. Sounds like a lot of work, right? In a new video, the Blue Oval has decided to take fans behind the scenes to show them what it takes to camouflage a prototype. In this case the subject was the recently unveiled 2014 Falcon XR8 for Australia.

Ford's prototype build coordinator Down Under has the very appropriate name of Neil Trickey, and it's his job to obfuscate the important bits of test cars to keep them out of spy shooters' camera lenses. Trickey calls his job a "dark art," and he shows off some of the tricks of his trade in the video. It turns out that the fabric we often see on mules is a type of lycra, but his team isn't above getting out a can of spray paint to conceal parts, too.

Scroll down to watch a video about a man who you probably wish could be a little worse at his job.

Continue reading Ford car-camo artist works his craft on Australia's new Falcon XR8

Ford car-camo artist works his craft on Australia's new Falcon XR8 originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 25 Jul 2014 17:15:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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How Ford hid the 2015 Mustang from spy photographers

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2015 ford mustang spy shot video

Now that we've finally seen the 2015 Ford Mustang, it's fun to go back and look at the spy shots we spent months pouring over, trying to dissect what was under all the camouflage. For the most part, Ford did a good job of concealing the car from spy photographers, and it released a video showing how much work went into doing so.

As crude as the Mustang's camo looked, all of the hard plastic, foam, vinyl and ratchet straps were actually created and put in place by a specific design team. The whole idea was to hide the car's identity, but it certainly ended up acting as a magnet for attention, too. According to Ford's press release, it took less than an hour for spy shots to appear online after the car was taken on public roads for the very first time - this is likely in reference to our first official spy shots of the Mustang from June, shown in the gallery below.

Scroll down for a press release and video, which shows footage of the 2015 Ford Mustang testing with minimal camouflage. This is probably the same track session where we got our first look at the Mustang's face back in August.

Continue reading How Ford hid the 2015 Mustang from spy photographers

How Ford hid the 2015 Mustang from spy photographers originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 20 Dec 2013 14:59:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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How Ford hid the 2015 Mustang from spy photographers

Filed under: , , , ,

2015 ford mustang spy shot video

Now that we've finally seen the 2015 Ford Mustang, it's fun to go back and look at the spy shots we spent months pouring over, trying to dissect what was under all the camouflage. For the most part, Ford did a good job of concealing the car from spy photographers, and it released a video showing how much work went into doing so.

As crude as the Mustang's camo looked, all of the hard plastic, foam, vinyl and ratchet straps were actually created and put in place by a specific design team. The whole idea was to hide the car's identity, but it certainly ended up acting as a magnet for attention, too. According to Ford's press release, it took less than an hour for spy shots to appear online after the car was taken on public roads for the very first time - this is likely in reference to our first official spy shots of the Mustang from June, shown in the gallery below.

Scroll down for a press release and video, which shows footage of the 2015 Ford Mustang testing with minimal camouflage. This is probably the same track session where we got our first look at the Mustang's face back in August.

Continue reading How Ford hid the 2015 Mustang from spy photographers

How Ford hid the 2015 Mustang from spy photographers originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 20 Dec 2013 14:59:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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